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Between Church and Wellington on Queen St.

Between Church and Wellington on Queen St.

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Eye Emergencies (Pink/Red Eyes)

Red, Pink or Sore Eyes?

We are ready to look after ALL of your eye care needs in one location. In addition to the services you already rely on us for such as routine eye exams, surgeries, contact lenses. designer frames and eyeglasses - think of your Optometrist first for:

  • sore, red, or itchy eyes
  • treatment of "pink eye" and other bacterial infections
  • removal of foreign bodies from the eye (such as wood or metal)
  • treatment of eye allergies or burns
  • emergency eye care

This is convenient and cost effective for your whole family and you can be sure you are receiving the attention of an eye care specialist.

Eye Emergencies

We are always willing to help, should you ever experience an eye emergency. Our St. Marys eye care centre provides emergency services for eye infections, eye injuries and other eye urgencies.  State of the art equipment allows us to examine the front surface of the eye and also digitally scan inside the eye for infection or damage We accommodate many eye emergencies such as:

  • Eye infections
  • Foreign materials stuck in the eyes
  • Eye trauma
  • Scratched eyes
  • Sudden loss of vision in one or both eyes
  • Lost or broken contact lenses or eyeglasses
  • Flashes of light in the vision
  • “Floaters” in the vision
  • Red or painful eyes
  • Dislodged contact lenses
  • Uncomfortable, itchy, or irritated eyes

Studies have shown that an overwhelming number of emergency room visits could have been treated by an optometrist. These ranged from foreign bodies to severe eye allergies to eye infections as the most common reasons for emergency room visits. It is not always necessary to go to an emergency room for eye emergencies. Optometrists are equipped to treat the majority of eye emergencies.

We understand the importance of eye care when you encounter symptoms such as those listed above. These are signs that an immediate evaluation or consultation is necessary - please call us to set one up if you are experiencing an eye emergency of any kind.

Foreign Body Removal

A foreign body is something such as an eyelash, sawdust, sand, or dirt can that gets into the eyes. The main symptom is irritation or pain. Depending on what it is and how the injury happened, the foreign body may pierce the eye and cause serious injury or it may simply go away with no long-term problem.

The foreign object may set off an inflammatory cascade, resulting in dilation of the surrounding vessels and subsequent edema of the lids, conjunctiva, and cornea. If not removed, a foreign body can cause infection.

If anything is stuck in your eye for more than a period of a couple of hours, you must immediately cease all attempts to remove it yourself. Keep in mind that the eyes are an extremely delicate organ and any attempts to try anything extra ordinary with them can only have negative and adverse results. If the foreign body you are talking about is not bothering you too much, then you are advised to visit an eye doctor to take care of it. If not you may need to call to emergency service of your region.

If there is a foreign body in your eye, such as a piece of grit, your eye doctor may try and remove it. They will put anaesthetic eye drops in your eye first, in order to numb it and prevent any pain.

If the foreign body is easy to get to, it may be possible to remove it by simply rinsing your eye with water, or by wiping it away with a cotton wool bud or triangle of card. However, if this is unsuccessful, your eye doctor may try and remove the foreign body by lifting it out with the tip of a small metal instrument.

The foreign body could be stuck underneath your upper eyelid, especially if you can feel something there, or you have scratches or grazes (abrasions) on the top half of the transparent outer layer of your eye (cornea). If this is the case, it may be necessary to gently turn your eyelid inside out in order to remove the foreign body.

Once the anaesthetic eye drops have worn off, your eye may feel a bit uncomfortable until your abrasion heals.

Whatever is happening with your eyes or if you suffer or even suspect that a foreign body has penetrated the outer eye layer better go without delay to the nearest treatment center. Doing nothing can lead to loss of vision, premature cataracts and damage to the retina so do not take any chances, delay is dangerous.

 

Source: Removing a Foreign Body from Your Eye, article by CareEyeEasy.com. All rights reserved.  Reproduction other than for one-time personal use is strictly prohibited.

Hours & Location

With our office in St. Marys, St. Marys Optometry has been serving the community since 2010.

Call us to make an appointment with our eye doctor to talk about your eyeglasses, contact lenses or specialty lens needs. You are also welcome to drop in anytime to browse through our large selection of designer eyeglass frames and sunglasses.

St. Marys Optometry

Contact Details
Address
151 Queen Street E
St. Marys, ON N4X 1A9
Hours
  • 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM
  • 1:00 PM - 8:00 PM
  • 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM
  • 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM
  • 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM
  • Closed
  • Closed
Payment Information

We Accept:

  • visa
  • mastercard
  • interac
  • cash
  • check

Our Eye Doctors

Eye care professionals specialize in understanding how the human eye really works, as well as diseases and conditions that affect your vision – many of which do not have obvious symptoms. Eye doctors know how age and risk factors affect vision over time for young and old, and they understand the benefits and features of corrective lenses including eyeglasses and contacts.

Our optometrists in St. Marys, ON take the time to explain the results of your eye exam, describe your options and listen to your eye care needs. Because maintaining good eye health is an ongoing partnership, we encourage you to ask questions and share your health information, which could be vital to monitoring, diagnosing and treating potential vision problems.

Meet our St. Marys Eye Doctors:

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Dr. Carol Venn

When Carol isn’t being awesome at work she can be found coaching ringette or walking around town with her dog Scout. Carol is a Doctor of Optometry graduate of the University of Waterloo. Carol wanted to be part of the local scene so she opened St Marys Optometry in 2010. She loves providing eye health exams to the community and as a mom is especially great with kids and babies.  In her free time she likes to spend time with her husband Mike and their kids Meg & Luke, relax with a glass of wine, stay up late and sleep in.  Carol’s favourite frame brands are Vanni, Modo and Maui Jim.  According to Carol the best places to shop locally are Nail Effects, Dunny’s Source for Sports, O’Grady’s Clothing and Accessories, Sensations and The Town and Country Cheese Shoppe.

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Dr. Erica Gagnon

Erica obtained her undergraduate degree in Biology from the University of Windsor. She then went on to complete her Doctorate of Optometry at the Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago. When she wasn't studying she could be found consuming many deep dish pizzas!

Erica has a remarkable passion for serving the families of St. Marys and the surrounding area, going out of her way to meet and help everyone she can. The highlight of Erica's day is getting to meet new people and making eye care fun, informative and approachable.

In her spare time Erica likes to travel the world, go swimming at the beach and participate in sports such as soccer volleyball, and triathlons. But more than anything, Erica loves spending time with friends and family; especially her husband, new baby Ivy and their dog, Maverick.

Eye Care Services

At St. Marys Optometry, we provide comprehensive eye health and vision exams for all ages. We recognize that patients of different ages have different concerns regarding their vision, and our exams are designed accordingly, whether patients are infants, children, teens, adults or seniors.

We have an extended network of vision care professionals. When your eye health requirements fall outside of our scope of services, we will either co-manage with or refer to the appropriate eye health specialist in our network.

Thorough Eye Exams in St. Marys, ON

Comprehensive eye exams for adults and children, co-management of laser vision correction surgery, caring for eye emergencies and so much more. Dr. Carol Venn provides comprehensive eye care to patients of all ages including treatment for a range of conditions including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, dry eye, cataracts and macular degeneration.

Treating Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease that only affects diabetics. It occurs when the fragile vascular network that supplies the retina – the light sensitive tissue at the back of the eye that helps us see – begins to swell or leak. During the beginning stages of the disease, there may be no noticeable symptoms, so it’s important to have your eyes checked at least once a year, if you have diabetes.

Once symptoms of diabetic retinopathy do develop, they can include: dark or black spots in your visual field, or blurry vision, and it increases over time. This is a result of bleeding at the back of the eye, which prevents a clear image from being transmitted from the retina to the brain.

Whether you have type 1, type 2, or even just gestational diabetes, you are at risk for developing diabetic retinopathy. The longer you have had the disease, the greater the risk. It is essential to keep your blood sugar levels under control to prevent vision loss, and this may require a trip back to your primary care physician.

Treating diabetic retinopathy can include vitrectomy, replacing the inner gel-like substance that supports the eyeball structure, advanced tests and laser surgery.

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

Treating Macular Degeneration

Untreated macular degeneration is one of the leading causes of blindness in those over 65 years old.

While researchers have not yet discovered a cure for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), there are treatment options which prevent the disease from progressing to blindness, and in some cases, they can even improve vision. It’s important to have an open discussion with your eye doctor about the risks and limitations of AMD treatments.

Types of Macular Degeneration:

There are 2 basic types of AMD, the wet form and the dry form.

  • Dry macular degeneration is considered the less aggressive form of AMD. It typically progresses much more slowly, and the level of eyesight damage is less severe. Dry AMD is detected during routine eye exams, which is why it’s important to have yearly testing. Treating Dry AMD often involves high doses of zinc and antioxidants which have been shown to slow diseases progression.
  • Wet macular degeneration is the more severe form of AMD. It occurs when there is abnormal blood vessel growth (angiogenesis), and leakage, which can cause scar tissue to develop. Treatments include laser surgery, injecting light sensitive dyes, or AMD medication injected directly into the eye to inhibit angiogenesis.

Learn More

AMD is an age related eye disease that runs in families, and is a leading cause of blindness in our aging population. There is no cure for this ocular disease, and AMD related vision loss is cannot usually be recovered. There are treatments, and preventative measures that can be taken, if detected early, so routine eye exams are essential.

Read more about macular degeneration symptoms and treatment.
Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

Glaucoma Testing & Treatment

Glaucoma - Why Miss Anything?

What is Glaucoma exactly?

Glaucoma IllustrationIt's often associated with a buildup of pressure inside the eye. Glaucoma tends to be inherited and you should get yourself checked if others in your family have been diagnosed with this disorder. Over time, glaucoma will cause permanent loss of vision and without treatment, glaucoma can cause total permanent blindness within a few years.

Are you at high risk for Glaucoma?

  • If you are over the age of 40 and if you have a family history of glaucoma.
  • GRF recommends that African-Americans get a thorough check for glaucoma every one to two years after age 35.
  • Talk to family members about glaucoma. If family members have glaucoma, then your glaucoma risk is increased.
  • If you have diabetes or high blood pressure.
  • Hispanic Americans in older age groups are also at greater risk for glaucoma.
  • Steroid Users - adults who require approximately 14 to 35 puffs of steroid inhaler to control asthma have an increased incidence of glaucoma.
  • Eye Injury - Injury to the eye may cause secondary open-angle glaucoma. This type of glaucoma can occur immediately after the injury or years later.
  • Eye disease such as macular degeneration will also increase your chances of having glaucoma.
Book Your Eye Exam Now Learn More on Glaucoma

Maybe you need a Glaucoma Test?

What is a Glaucoma test? Glaucoma testing involves measuring internal eye pressure and a detailed scan of the retina for signs of disease.

  • Only a comprehensive eye exam can reveal whether or not you have glaucoma.
  • Increased pressure inside the eye is often a key indicator of glaucoma, though not exclusively so.
  • Glaucoma QuoteEye doctors can use a number of tests for eye pressure but will, by default, check for signs of glaucoma as part of a detailed exam
  • An examination of the retina—the light sensitive area at the back of the eye responsible for processing images is only the true way you will know you have Glaucoma.

How Does Glaucoma Testing Work?

There are two types of Glaucoma tests that measure the internal pressure of the eye but one is much more accurate than the other.

One glaucoma test involves measuring what happens when a puff of air is blown across the surface of the eye. (A puff test) Another test uses a special device (in conjunction with eye-numbing drops) to “touch” the surface of the eye to measure eye pressure.
While increased eye pressure is a key indicator of the disease, it does not necessarily mean you have a glaucoma diagnosis. In fact, the only way to detect glaucoma is to have a detailed, comprehensive eye exam that often includes dilation of the pupils.
So “true” glaucoma testing actually involves examining the retina and optic nerve at the back of the eye for signs of the disease.

Learn More

Glaucoma can cause slight to severe vision loss, and is often discovered only after the disease is present—that’s why glaucoma testing is so important.

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

Cataract Surgery Co-Management

Cataracts is a disease of the eye that results in the clouding of the lens of the eyeball. Cataracts prevent clear images from appearing on the eye’s retina; causing mild, moderate, even severe blurred vision.

Typically an eye disorder associated with aging (over half of the people in America over age 80 have either had a cataract or cataract surgery), cataracts generally occur later in life as the lens structure within the human eye changes and gets older.

During the evaluation of your eye health we will carefully examine your lens for signs of cataract formation. If a cataract is noticed and the clouding is causing visual disruption, the optometrist will refer you to a trusted and respected surgeon for surgery, which is the only known cure for cataracts. St. Marys Optometry will be there for you providing pre and post cataract surgery care.

Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgery is the removal of the natural lens of the eye (also called "crystalline lens") that has developed an opacification, which is referred to as a cataract. Metabolic changes of the crystalline lens fibers over the time lead to the development of the cataract and loss of transparency, causing impairment or loss of vision. During cataract surgery, a patient's cloudy natural lens is removed and replaced with a synthetic lens to restore the lens's transparency.

Following surgical removal of the natural lens, an artificial intraocular lens implant is inserted (eye surgeons say that the lens is "implanted"). Cataract surgery is generally performed by an ophthalmologist (eye surgeon) in an ambulatory (rather than inpatient) setting, in a surgical center or hospital, using local anesthesia (either topical, peribulbar, or retrobulbar), usually causing little or no discomfort to the patient. Well over 90% of operations are successful in restoring useful vision, with a low complication rate. Day care, high volume, minimally invasive, small incision phacoemulsification with quick post-op recovery has become the standard of care in cataract surgery all over the world.

Learn More

cataracts iconThe more you know about cataracts, the better prepared you will be to deal with them – or help prevent them in the first place!

Learn more about Glaucoma Testing and treatment.